India is the place to be, say home-bound doctors | Healthcare in India |

After technology sector, it's the health sector in Bangalore that is witnessing a reverse brain drain. Across fields-nephrology, general medicine, pathology, orthopaedics and oncology among others, doctors are returning to India in general and Bangalore in particular.

On an average big medical hospital chains in the city each get 8 to 10 applications every month from Indian doctors in the US, the UK, Canada, Australia and Singapore. "I interview one doctor a week. And in the last six months I have got 12 applications for jobs from doctors abroad. They are all in their 30s," says Dr H Sudarshan Ballal, medical director, Manipal Hospitals.

The scene is no different at Sparsh Hospital on Narayana Health City campus where chief orthopaedic and hospital head Dr Sharan Patil scrutinizes at least 10 applications every month from doctors in the UK, Australia and the US.

"There is no bigger canvas to paint yourself than in medicine. Two decades ago when doctors left India, the opportunities were few. Today opportunities outweigh frustrations. After the training, they want to return," says Dr Patil, who himself spent five years in the UK before returning to the city to become a doctor-entrepreneur.

Ten of the 40 orthopaedicians at Sparsh are those who have returned from abroad. "I began to feel I was making no difference in my job and decided to leave Australia. I find it more satisfying here. But it is good to study and train abroad for some time," says Dr A Thomas, spine surgeon, who practised for five years at St George Hospital, University of South Wales.

Hospital honchos are seeing the trend only in the past five years. In many hospital chains of Bangalore, the entrepreneurs are doctors themselves who left practice in the dream country where they were and came back home.