Healthcare in India
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Healthcare in India
Selection of Articles, Opinions, Discussions and News on Healthcare in India from all over the web covering Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Reform, News, Events, #HealthIT , Edipdemics, Chronic Diseases, #mHealth, #hcsmin ,
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“Indian Doctors are More Technology Savvy than the US Doctors”

“Indian Doctors are More Technology Savvy than the US Doctors” | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

We feel that Indians are very technology savvy. There are more than 700 million cell phones in India today. Even Indian doctors are more technology savvy than the US Doctors.

 

So we have a right playground, not every player has to decide how he has to play, so technology has a big role to play. It is a philosophical issue but there is a disconnect between the technology field and the healthcare field. Healthcare is a very deep vertical branch.

 

It takes you 15 years to be a surgeon. It takes 20 years to be a good neuro surgeon and you are so busy learning this stuff that you don’t understand IT or online wesites or what internet can do to do your job better. If you do an industry analysis, banking is the most advanced industry in terms of leveraging technology for doing day to day operations.

 

Do we have a healthcare ATM? Why cannot we have it? How hard it is to have it? You can dispense coke in a machine manually, you can do blood pressure readings manually remotely. Nobody has invented healthcare ATM where you can go, get your BP or sugar taken and some doctor can see you and dispense medicines.

 

Max Healthcare is working towards making quality healthcare available to every person in India through adoption of innovative technologies. Ajay Bakshi, CEO, Max Healthcare, in conversation with Divya Chawla & Shally Makin, speaks about the key issues that affect the Indian healthcare industry today

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Skeptical Scalpel: CME is a joke

Skeptical Scalpel: CME is a joke | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

I know it’s a good idea for us docs to participate in continuing education. What physician doesn’t understand that graduating from medical school/residency training is just the beginning of a life-long educational journey? And hospitals and states require CME for maintaining privileges and licenses.

 

But here’s the problem. With the possible exception of courses during which you learn a new technique [but be careful if they are industry sponsored], most CME activities are useless. A recent meta-analysis of the value of CME showed that physician effectiveness and patient outcomes are not influenced much by CME activities. Another two studies [here & here] showed that the didactic session, the most frequently used CME method, is the least effective at changing physician behavior. Samuel Johnson said it 200 years ago: “Lectures were once useful; but now, when all can read, and books are so numerous, lectures are unnecessary.”

 

There’s also the problem of assessing the knowledge acquired at a didactic session like a lecture or paper presented at a conference. Most society meetings or congresses just mandate that you sign in. You could be sleeping, daydreaming or surfing the Internet on your smart phone while sitting in the audience.

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Providing Patients with Access to their Personal Medical Records On-The-Go

These are the slides from my talk on "Providing Patients with Access to their Personal Medical Records On-The-Go" at the 2nd Annual Wireless Healthcare Asia Summit 2012 in Singapore. Instead of talking about hard core tech and uber cool technologies, this time I touched upon the issues which have hurt the adoption of patient record technologies and driven the usage down, and caused consequent fragmentation of potential solutions. I strongly feel that actively driving adoption is the key to realizing the benefits of healthcare technology. And my talk was about a 3 point strategy to electronic patient records. INTEGRATE , ENGAGE AND SHARE...

 

http://www.slideshare.net/nrip/providing-patients-with-access-to-their-personal-medical-records-onthego

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Telemedicine Through Skype

Tell us about the role that the government can play in furthering the growth of telemedicine in the country.

 

Telemedicine is an idea whose time has come. It can be of great help in our rural population. The government is taking many new initiatives to further the growth of telemedicine in the country. There is plan for connecting all the medical colleges and major hospitals through the National Knowledge Network (NKN). There is also plan to link all district hospitals with leading tertiary medical centres. The same infrastructure can also be used for providing medical consultation to people in different parts of the country. People living in one part of the country will be able to interact with doctors residing in some other part by use of telemedicine.

 

What are your expectations in the telemedicine sector from the Twelfth Five Year plan?

 

To improve healthcare services in the remote parts of the country, the Planning Commission plans a massive exercise of adopting telemedicine by use of software applications such as Skype. If I may quote the report on health for the 12th Five-Year plan directly, it says, “Computer with Internet connectivity should be ensured in every primary health centre within this Plan period; sub-centres will have extended connectivity through cellphones, depending on their state of readiness and skill set of their functionaries. The availability of Skype and other similar applications for audio-visual interaction makes telemedicine a near-universal possibility and could be used to ameliorate the professional isolation of health personnel posted in remote and rural areas.”

 

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It’s Health First

The Central Bureau of Health Intelligence (CBHI) is the national nodal institution for health Intelligence in the country for maintaining and disseminating national health profile, health sector policy reform options database, and GIS mapping of Government’s health facilities in India. It reviews the progress of health sector millennium development goals in India. We facilitate capacity building and human resource development, and need based operational research for efficient health information system as well as use of family of international classification in India and South East Asia.

 

CBHI has been regularly bringing out its annual publication “National Health Profile (NHP)” since 2005. NHP involves sustained efforts to collect and collate an enormous national data from the direc-torates of health and family welfare services of all the states, central government organisation, na-tional health programmes and various other concerned national and international agencies in India.

 

National Health Profile highlights the information under six major health indicators viz. demography, socio-economic, health status, health finances, health infrastructure and human resources for the specified year, and other information required for an efficient public health system in the country.

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Health IT Takes a Giant Leap

Health IT Takes a Giant Leap | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

Healthcare information technology is undergoing enormous changes with broad consumer impact. 

 

Health IT spending in India and US is expected to continue growing because of rising healthcare costs, aging population and the cost reductions and efficiency gains that health IT is expected to generate. Instead, it will be doctors and large care giving organisations that help drive the adoption of healthcare IT. They, in turn, will be driven by monetary incentives that the government has written into laws.

 

Cloud computing in healthcare is converging health ecosystem. Cloud computing has given opportunities for healthcare companies to enter into an agreement with companies offering similar services and share data with the consent of patients to improve service. For large organisations, healthcare service is not the only line of business. A major share of business profit comes from retail or pharmaceutical operations. To ensure that these lines of business are performing well, one of the requirements is that they have a better supply change management and capacity planning.

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mHealth India Plans 2012

mHealth India Plans 2012 | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

Mobile Health is going to be a 3000 crore market in India by 2017. (Source PwC). M-health (use of mobile phones) and E-health are all set to make an entry into India's primary health centres (PHCs) and sub-centres as the health ministry plans to go hi-tech. Healthcare industry is expected to show a strong growth of 23% per annum to become a US$ 77 billion industry by 2012. One of the largest sector in terms of revenue and employment has grown at 9.3% per annum between 2000-2009 with a current size at par with fastest growing developing country like China, Brazil and Mexico.Driven by various catalysts such as increasing population, rising income levels, changing demographics and illness profile with a shift from chronic to life style diseases, healthcare industry is expected to move to levels of US$ 77 billion in next 3 years. (Source: ASSOCHAM).

 

Empowering rural India is of utmost importance and the government needs to do so by provisioning for broadband penetration and financial inclusion. Access to quality health care is another key to achieving rural empowerment. The budget for this segment was raised marginally last year and it would be good to have an allocation for rural health care programs with provisions for technology that would help modernize this sector to expand its reach through remote healthcare solutions and telemedicine.

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In India, a Small Pill, With Positive Side Effects

In India, a Small Pill, With Positive Side Effects | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

Mass campaigns to treat parasitic worms in children, like those underway in India, can bring long-term educational and social benefits, too.

 

On a cool February morning in north Delhi, India, 35 third graders sat at small desks in a spartan but tidy classroom. They wore blue school uniforms and listened as their teacher asked in Hindi if they had had intestinal worms.

 

A third of the children raised their hands, including 9-year-old Arjun Prasad. He sometimes felt stomach pain and weakness — symptoms of severe infection — he said. A few minutes later, Arjun and his classmates were given deworming pills, and took them during the class. They were among the 3.7 million children in Delhi who have taken the pills as part of a recent campaign in India’s capital to stamp out the widespread but neglected ailment.

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Is Managed Care at all a Possibility in Developing Countries?

Developing country environments are characterized by acute shortages of both financial and human resources for healthcare as well as by a high burden of infectious diseases. In the recent past a large and growing burden of non-communicable diseases has also become very visible in these countries. And, while this is not true of all developing countries, there are some such as India and China, which have additional problems imposed upon them by the sheer size of their landmass and a very large population. At over 3 million square kilometres, stretching 3,000 kilometres from one tip to another in both directions, and with a population crossing 1.2 billion individuals living in over 600,000 habitations, India is one of the largest countries in the world. Some of her districts have populations that are comparable to those of entire countries. For example, Burdwan District of West Bengal at 7 million has a population comparable to that of Papua New Guinea and Serbia.

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Medical Websites : Smart Health Care IT

Medical Websites : Smart Health Care IT | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

Websites for Doctors helps doctors, clinics and hospitals attract more patients and interact with peers via a Smart, Professional and Patient friendly Website. Its the First Step to Using Technology to benefit Health Care. As part of this concept, Medical Websites are Designed By Design Professionals which are supervised by Health Care Experts who add Medical Web Applications and Tools to sites depending on the set goals.

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Why Doctors Should Have Their Own Website

Why Doctors Should Have Their Own Website | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

A lot of doctors feel it's unethical for doctors to have a website because they feel it is a form of advertising . They feel that a website is a cheap gimmick, and respectable doctors do not need to stoop to such low levels in order to solicit patients - after all, there is a difference between doctors who are professionals and stores, which are out to sell their goods ! They feel it is below their dignity to put up a website ; and will actually look down upon other doctors who have an online presence.

 

My take on the matter is exactly the opposite. And in fact, I feel doctors who don't have websites are actually being unethical. Let's not forget that the word doctor is derived from the word docere , which means to teach ; and that one of the primary professional responsibilities of the doctor it to educate their patients, so that they can manage their diseases and take better care of their health. The medical profession is meant to educate laypeople , so that they can remain healthy and prevent illness .

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eHealth in India: Advancing on all levels

In healthcare, as in all other aspects of society, India is divided. Five hundred million people, that is 42% of the total population, live below the global poverty line (BPL) on less than 1.25 USD per day*. For them, the fact that 80% of the Indian healthcare sector is in private hands means “no access”. For India’s upper and middle classes, who account for roughly the same number of people who make up the population of the European Union, it means “world-class healthcare”. It is they who SIEMENS are addressing with their full-page diagnostic imaging advertisement in an onboard flight magazine. And it is they for whom eHealth is made. It is a fact I need to accept in order to free my mind for India’s digital healthcare revolution.

 

Listening to the keynote speeches delivered at eIndia, I am confused. Sangita Reddy, Executive Director of Apollo Hospital Group, for example, shares her experiences of developing and implementing a cloud-based hospital IT system that connects everybody with whom the hospital interacts – patients, suppliers, doctors, pharmacies and primary care, even a group hospital on Mauritius. Dr. Karanvir Singh, CIO of Dehli-based Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, says that their doctors already complete 50% of all medical records digitally –incentivized by the convenience of automatic discharge summaries and a dashboard for data analysis.

 

Is this India? I ask myself. The country that ranks 134 out of 158 in the Global Human Development Index?

 

Yes, it is.

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Planners concerned about data collection

Even as 2.5% of gross domestic product (GDP) is directed toward improving health indicators in India, policy planners have expressed concern over the long gaps between collecting data on health in contrast with information on economic indicators.

 

A committee on health has suggested more frequent data collection as is done with prices and employment numbers.

 

While wholesale or consumer price index data is collected weekly and monthly, maternal mortality information is collected every three years, that on malnourishment every five years, and morbidity every 10 years, by the National Sample Survey Organisation.

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Mobile Health Around the Globe: Telemedicine and Peritoneal Dialysis in India

Mobile Health Around the Globe: Telemedicine and Peritoneal Dialysis in India | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

ince about 75% of Indians live in remote rural areas and more than 75% of doctors live in cities, there is a large discrepancy in healthcare distribution. The Indian government, with the help of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has connected rural hospitals with city-based specialty hospitals through their GSAT satellites This network allows those in rural areas to have access to healthcare professionals and specialists. It also allows for mobile telemedicine units in remote villages.

 

A typical small health center telemedicine system includes a computer, software, and several medical devices (EKG, X-ray or scanner). Images and test results can then be sent to specialist doctors who can interpret the results and suggest treatment through video-conferencing.

 

In regards to India's telemedicine initiative, L.S. Sathyamurthy, Vice President of Telemedicine at ISRO, said,

 

“There are 650 district hospitals, 3,000 taluk [subdistrict] hospitals, and more than 23,000 primary health centers in the country. We must aim to connect all these in phases—first the district hospital connected to speciality hospitals in major cities, then the taluk-level hospitals, and finally the primary health centers, so that nobody, irrespective of his location, is deprived of lifesaving specialty consultation.”

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Healthcare@Mumbai is not-so-pink

Healthcare@Mumbai is not-so-pink | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

But as Mumbai's population increases beyond 18 million, so is the demand for healthcare facilities. The city is seeing an increase in hospital facilities through the expansion of existing hospitals and through new projects. But that is not enough, say representatives working with leading city hospitals. The need is for better distribution of good hospitals across the ever-expanding city, they point out.

Existing hospitals such as the charitable trust-run P. D. Hinduja or the Fortis-healthcare group managed S. L. Raheja Hospital in the private sector are seeing a massive scale-up in beds, facilities and specialisation. They are located in and around South or Central Mumbai.

 

In the Government-run space is JJ Hospital — whose corridors and lectures halls have been captured in one of Hindi cinemas' most thought-provoking comedies Munna Bhai MBBS. The hospital, that stands tall in the heart of the city, is also set for major expansion.

 

All hospital projects coming up in South and Central Mumbai are expansions at existing sites or previously committed sites through charitable trusts or the Government, observes Dr Vivek Desai, Managing Director of healthcare consultancy group, Hosmac India.

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Top hospitals in city shy away from e-health

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The city is warming up to the idea of e-health, thanks to doctors uploading content online and offering free services. But many top hospitals in the city do not facilitate public online exchange of information.

 

Ananthapuri and PRS hospital's websites only promote their establishments, while NIMS Heart Foundation and the Kerala Institute of Medical Sciences facilitate online interaction with their doctors in the 'get an opinion' segment, but unfortunately the answers cannot be viewed by the public.

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Healthcare Articles from India - 2000-2010

Healthcare Articles from India - 2000-2010 | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

BIRTH OF HOPE

Health initiative undertaken in Gujarat—Chiranjeevi Yojana—ensures better care of a pregnant woman and her child

 

Health on Fingertips

Kerala empowers its citizens by delivering health information directly to their mobile phone

Dr SMS is a key project of the Kerala State IT Mission, the technology implementation wing of the Government of Kerala in India, launched on 29th May 2008 with the aim to increase the common people’s accessibility to healthcare services through simple and innovative use of mobile telephony. The project is probably the largest initiative of the government in the mobile healthcare space.

 

Going All the Way

Government of Maharashtra is using ICT as a tool to enhance their ability and bringing more professionalism in healthcare services

Realising the challenges of dealing with providing healthcare services to a huge population, Government of Maharashtra decided to use ICT as a tool to enhance their ability to deal with this complex delivery model. Through this project, the entire patient registration and front office management of patients and casualty services was outsourced with an objective of bringing more professionalism in government hospitals.

 

Powering Laboratories

This accreditation is a formal recognition of the technical competence of a testing, calibration or medical laboratory for a specific task

National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories (NABL) is an autonomous body under the aegis of Department of Science & Technology, Government of India. Its objective is to provide Government, Industry Associations and Industry in general with a scheme for third-party assessment of the quality and technical competence of testing and calibration laboratories. Government of India has authorised NABL as the sole accreditation body for Testing and Calibration laboratories. NABL provides laboratory accreditation services to laboratories that are performing tests and calibrations for medical laboratories.

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EMR'S: PROVIDING INDIAN DOCTORS WITH AN EDGE: VOL 1

EMR'S: PROVIDING INDIAN DOCTORS WITH AN EDGE: VOL 1 | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

Typically, a patient's record is just a folder with his details and probably a photograph on the front cover, coupled with sheets and sheets of data recording his previous visits. While some of this data, especially prescriptions may be recorded in a hospital, can you imagine the long hard search that one endures to locate them when required. Also, this search by no means guarantees a consolidated view of a patient's information which would equip the doctor with a complete overview of the patient's health history. There is a serious need for a system in place which can ensure this Information be available Timely, Efficiently and Sensibly. All of a Patient’s information must be available at a single point of contact.

 

An Electronic Medical Record or EMR is a secure electronic file of patient history, medical transcription notes, billing information, and all other information necessary to have a complete patient profile. EMR's, or computer-based medical records of patients, have already gained importance in the western world with governments taking up initiatives to implement them across each nation. However, in Asia, esp. in countries like India and China, there is a long way to go before the benefits that are available to the entire Health Ecosystem by EMRs can be realized. In reality, here EMRs and other Health Softwares are still considered an undesired luxury. Many physicians tend to drag along the process of migrating to EMR's because of the cumbersome training, additional equipment, change in mindset and lack of immediate financial gains involved with the shift.

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India Needs a Giant Leap

India Needs a Giant Leap | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

The healthcare sector has become one of the most glorified sectors of the Indian economy with launch of world-class facilities with cutting-edge technologies. Even the global meltdown has not deterred growth of this sector, which continues to see unprecedented growth rates. From the consumers there continues to be a very high demand for quality healthcare.

 

To gain an insight into the present scenario for IT in healthcare, and the future prospects of the industry, eHealth magazine conducted a nationwide health IT survey. The survey is an effort to help the decision-makers from the Government and leaders of national health projects, ICT experts and policy-makers separate the wheat from the chaff. The respondents consider health IT “invaluable” because it “delivers capabilities that cannot be replaced by non-IT tools;” and “significantly aids in the delivery of care.”

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Medical Tourism in Hyderabad rises at 20% per annum

A recent study has shown that most of the international patients come to Hyderabad not only for treatments but also because of Hyderabadi Deccani culture and its association with Middle Eastern countries. “With over 50 per cent of patients from the Middle East and Africa, Hyderabad’s medical tourism scenario is rising at around 20 per cent per annum and stands 4th in the country,” said Dr K Hariprasad, CEO, Apollo Hospitals.

 

A good number of international patients also come from South East Asia and Africa apart from countries like Afghanistan, Iraq, Oman, Saudi Arabia, and a minimum of 0.1 per cent of them all come from countries like the USA and Japan. The most sought after super specialities are Neurology, ENT, Spine and Orthopaedics.

 

Hospitals also believe that a boom in Medical Tourism in the city could be due to the development of the international airport at Shamshabad as well as the global marketing of Indian hospital services. “We make prior inquiries and appointments before coming to India for treatment. Most of them maintain a special department for handling international patients,” said a patient from Yemen who did not want to be named.

 

“We take care of the patient right from applying for a visa to providing budget accommodation for the patient’s relatives, foreign exchange facility, bank transfer facility, co-ordination with Indian embassies for visa, FRRO assistance and local shopping assistance. We also have all language interpreters,” said various hospital managers.

 

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How Electronic Health Records Can Enhance the Quality of Health Services Delivery

How Electronic Health Records Can Enhance the Quality of Health Services Delivery | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

Imagine an elderly man who walks into a primary care unit seeking treatment; his old age hampers his ability to remember past medical experiences, restricting the information the healthcare professional can use to make an informed judgement about this condition. Now, what if the patient’s medical profile were just a click away? Appropriate care could be delivered much quicker and far more accurately.

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Googling disease symptoms the new form of diagnosis

Googling disease symptoms the new form of diagnosis | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

Feeling edgy or upset for no apparent reason, you Google your symptoms. It turns out to be nothing serious and your fears are unfounded. More than 60 percent of Americans get their health information online, and a majority of those decide whether to see a doctor based on what they find, a study reveals.”Wow, this is an era of self-diagnosis,” thought Arizona State University psychologist Virginia Kwan, learning that statistic. How might information accessed online affect individual health decisions?


Kwan and colleagues found that the way information is presented-specifically, the order in which symptoms are listed-makes a significant difference, the journal Psychological Science reported. “People irrationally infer more meanings from a ‘streak’”- an uninterrupted series whether of high rolls of the dice or disease symptoms of consecutively reported symptoms. If they check off more symptoms in a row, the research found, “they perceive a higher personal risk of having that illness,” said Kwan, according to a university statement.The findings could prove useful for public health education, Kwan said: “With certain types of illnesses, people tend to seek medical attention at the latest stage.” Meanwhile, “People also go to doctors asking all the time about illnesses that are very rare,” added Kwan.

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Success story of a doctor who turned an entrepreneur

Success story of a doctor who turned an entrepreneur | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it
Winner of this year's TiEcon award for Social Entrepreneur of the Year, Dr P Srinivasan, is the Chairman and Managing Director of Jeevan Blood Bank and Research Centre.

 

There are many who run from pillar to post for a bottle of rare blood at least once in their lifetime. Helping people in such distress is a doctor in Chennai. Giving blood free of cost to the needy is his life's motto.

 

Winner of this year's TiEcon award for Social Entrepreneur of the Year, Dr P Srinivasan, is the Chairman and Managing Director of Jeevan Blood Bank and Research Centre.

 

He started Jeevan Blood Bank with the sole intention of giving uncontaminated blood to those in dire need. He has also started a not-for-profit public stem cell bank, again to offer it free for the needy.

Here is the story of Jeevan Blood Bank.

 

Journey of a doctor

 

I had decided that I would work only in India, as in the early 70's when I studied medicine in the Government Medical College, all I spent was Rs 1,200 for my entire medical education.

I feel I used public money to study medicine and hence I had a responsibility to the public. I started working on 1 January 1981 in a 100-bed hospital in Chennai.

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Swasthya Slate : Now, a tablet that’s also a mini lab for doctors

A tablet computer that works as a diagnostic tool for multiple activities like conduct ECG, measure heart rate, test quality of water and also take body temperature.

 

Swasthya Slate ( Health Tablet) - a first-of-its-kind diagnostic tool - created by a US-returned Indian biomedical engineer Kanav Kahol will not only perform all these tasks but will also test blood pressure and blood sugar on the spot.

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The Hindu : Sci-Tech : Travails in medical imaging of bulky patients

The Hindu : Sci-Tech : Travails in medical imaging of bulky patients | Healthcare in India | Scoop.it

Keen observation and analysis of case sheets of patients proved rewarding for Dr Raul Uppot, a young radiologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), in Boston, U.S. He realised that a tiny fraction of patients are denied medical imaging facilities simply because they are bulky. Radiologists could not provide optimum image quality and accurate diagnoses in their cases.

 

Dr. Uppot and his co-workers reviewed the radiology reports filed between 1989 and 2003 labelled as “limited by body habitus” meaning limited in quality due to the patient's size. They found that over the 15-year period, the percentage of such reports nearly doubled from 0.10 in 1989 to 0.19 in 2003. It correlated strongly with the increase in obesity in Massachusetts State from 9 per cent in 1991 to 16 per cent in 2001.

 

He presented the study at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA-2004). RSNA appreciated his paper and awarded him the 2004 Research Fellow Trainee Prize of $ 1,000.

 

Dr Uppot observed that in the 15-year-old retrospective study of radiological exams at MGH, the diagnostic information of 0.15 per cent of the five million studies was limited by the body weight of patients. They did not include patients whose examinations were cancelled because they could not fit on the table.

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